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Let’s chat about what it is and what it isn’t… right vs wrong… understanding vs judging… consideration vs assuming. You see, so many believe they ‘know’, but really do we know?! There is a famous philosopher, Rene Descartes, not one of my favourites, but regardless one thing he noted through his search for wisdom was… ‘it is imprudent to trust that which has deceived even once’. In other words, if a particular thing or person misleads you once, believe it the first time. And note, I use the word ‘particular’ because many generalize lessons to a whole when that ought not to be the case, as that’s creates a whole story -false narrative. So I say particular as in, specific to one thing and one thing only, and nothing which references or attributes similar traits to such thing.

And the example he used to explain his analogy was… put a stick in water and it will look distorted but take it out, you will see it is straight. And through that line reasoning, he managed to create doubt in our senses. Senses such as vision, as we can’t believe everything we see, there is always more truth to the matter. But yet, so many judge and assume based on what they see… not on what they know. As we rarely ever know anything, especially that which is outside of ourselves. Hence the importance of not relying on the face value shown, but rather looking beyond.

The ability to consider all, rather than assume one. Because what is knowledge if not exploration?! We can pretend all we want, pretend and act as though we know, when in actuality we really know nothing of what we think know. As mentioned prior, so many of us take one stance and multiply it by the rest, applying the particular to the general. When in reality, all are unique and no two things are the same, no matter alike they may seem. And so, to treat them as such is disservice to the mind you’ve been given. It’s like using 5 percent when you could use 20. You’re selling yourself short. Not giving yourself the opportunity to progress, but allowing yourself to remain stagnant -emotionally and mentally.

And the thing is, you can’t have physical growth without first having emotional or mental growth. Especially in the generation that we are living in at the moment. Back in the day, our intellectual capacity didn’t matter much, at least not on a metaphysical level. Nowadays, it’s about the way in which we relate… how and why we relate. Which is why perspective is of massive importance… especially if you want to make waves. As you can’t make waves unless you’re aware of the climate and environment that surrounds you. Most importantly, aware of strengthens and weaknesses that lay within you.

As we can only know the external insofar as we come to know the internal. And once we began the process within ourselves are we able to apply it to outer world. And that allows for broader range of wisdom, as one is no longer judging and assuming… but rather, asking and challenging… thinking and considering…understanding and not judging. For how else would one grow?! How else would one attain knowledge?! Granted that, knowledge is sought, not defined. And that’s it beauty, as it gives us the power to look beyond. It give us possibility.

Because when we rely solely on what is given, disregarding what is to be sought out, we close the door to what is possible. We restrict evolution. Restrict possibilities.

For the way a rich man educates themselves on taxes ought to be the same all educate themselves on perspective. The accounting of every scenario, in order to best know what root is the one to be taking… but that is the difference between the investor and the trader. Short-term vs long-term. Do you save yourself in the moment? Or set yourself for the long-run? The power is yours. It’s a matter of switching the perspective.

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